Etobicoke Homes for Sale
  Re/Max Realty Specialists Inc., Brokerage
Independently Owned and Operated
   
 
david@davidpylyp.com
416 233 9000
 
 
 
 
Communities
 
Lakeview, Port Credit, Mississauga

 

Eleganthomesinwesttoronto.com, lakview, mississauga,

 Click on Photo for link to Google Earth Map of Port Credit Harbour Yacht Club

 

 

 

 

March 2, 2008  - The approval of a 22-storey condominium tower to be built close to the Mississauga waterfront in Port Credit has residents' groups divided and has sparked fears it could lead to a highrise jungle along Lakeshore Rd.

 

 

 

 
"This could very well set a precedent for highrise buildings on the north side of Lakeshore going both east and west (of Hurontario St.)," says Ian Smith, president of the Town of Port Credit Association, a 100-household group formed to oppose the condo project called North Shore.


"There are certainly a number of sites along Lakeshore, in terms of the price of land and location, that are ideal for redevelopment and where taller buildings could be accommodated."     

Lakeview Update July 16th 2008

 

Lakeview History written by SCOTT KLETKE 

At the time of the first historical contacts between Europeans and natives in the Lakeview area in the 1600s, the land was occupied by a alliance of Iroquois speaking people whose territory included much of Southern Ontario from the Niagara River to Windsor to Georgian Bay and included the Petun, Tobacco and Hurons. These Iroquois were allied to the French and not politically associated with the 6 Nations Confederacy (also Iroquois) who were allied to first the Dutch and then the English but were independent. and lived south of Lake Ontario in the Finger Lakes region of New York State. In fact these two Iroquois factions were antagonistic towards each other and mirrored the antagonism of their European trading allies.

In the mid 1600s the 6 Nations Confederacy launched a multi pronged attack on the northern confederacy and largely eliminated them politically. The Senecas who were the western most group of the 6 Nations and traditionally from around the Buffalo NY area moved into the area around the north shore of Lake Ontario and took over the beaver hunting grounds. The had a number of villages including one in the Baby Point area of Toronto.

In response to this occupation, the Mississaugas, a semi-nomadic group of native Canadians associated with the Algonquian language family. who were also allied to the northern Iroquois and the French launched a coordinated invasion of Southern Ontario from their home territory at the north end of Lake Huron and successfully drove out the Senecas. According to Betty Clarksons book about Port Credit, during construction of a basement on a building on Lakeshore Road in Port Credit, they discovered the buried but standing upright body of the Mississauga war chief that accomplished the invasion. The Port Credit area thus has a proud but largely unknown military history.

Just prior to European settlement, the area around Lakeview was occupied by the Mississaugas, This large extended culture group includes the Cree, Ojibwa, Ottawa, Chippewa, Micmac and Algonquians with varying degrees of closeness between language and customs.

During the warm season, in the Lakeview area the Mississaugas traditionally migrated out of the woodlands and down to the lake where they would escape the mosquitoes and fish the waters of the lake and the river mouths. There was a large annual concentration of Mississaugas at the mouth of the Credit River, where they would group together to share stories, socialize and enjoy the summer months. During the cold season they would break up into family groups and move back into the woods to run their trap lines and hunt.

Early French traders from the small French trading fort at the mouth of the Humber River and on the grounds of the Exhibition grounds would arrive at the Riviere au Credite to trade with the Mississaugas of the Credit. This tradition continued when the English absorbed the old French fur trade in the area.

The Credit Mississaugas lost most of their land in Mississauga between Burlngton and Etobicoke during the Mississauga purchase but maintained a reserve a mile to the east and west of the Credit River. At this time their main village was on the grounds of the present Mississauga Golf Club and a smaller settlement was on the west side of the river at the river mouth.

Illnesses and disease caused by drinking heavily industrially polluted river water so severely imperiled their lives and well being that they were largely forced to cede their treaty reserve lands to the colonists and flee to the Grand River where they were welcomed by their former enemies the 6 Nations Confederacy and given land in repayment to the southern Ontario Mississaugas who earlier gifted them with a new homeland after the 6 Nations stalwart defense of the English during the American revolution had cost them their ancestral lands on the Finger Lakes.Pre-European Settlement

The Mississauga Purchase opened up a vast new tract for colonization. Soon the Lakeshore Road and Dundas Road were created to facilitate the new wave of immigrants with new communities and dreams. On Lakeshore Road along each of the rivers, large creeks and cross roads there developed communities in Burlington, Bronte, Oakville, Clarkson, Port Credit, Lakeview and Long Branch. During the 1840s these areas were virtually denuded of their primeval forest cover and turned into farms. Many of these farm owners family names are reflected in the street names we know today.

The western edge of the Lakeview area corresponds to the eastern edge of the old Credit Mississauga reserve which became the eastern edge of Port Credit village after the abandonment of the reserve by the Mississaugas.

1800s

The 1900s brought new challenges to the Lakeview area. At the beginning of the century the areas was largely rural with small communities at the various crossroads. With the advent of World War 1, Lakeview began its shift from a rural economy to a military, industrial and finally suburban one.

The first aerodrome (airport) in Canada was located on the present day grounds of the old Lakeview Generating Station. Here pilots were trained for overseas aerial warfare. The federal government had obtained a large tract of Lakefront land in the eastern end of Lakeview that it used during the years for various military purposes including armaments manufacture, weapons training and barracks.

During World War 2 the government operated a small arms manufactory. It produced huge quantities of weapons for use overseas. After the war the plant was closed and it largely female work force was laid off. See the newspaper article links below for some contemporary insight into the lives of our citizens at that time

1900s

Lakeview today consists of a largely suburban economy with light industrial along much of the prime Lakefront land south of Lakeshore Road. There is controversy over the future zoning directions of the community. Currently, city council is developing a secondary plan to address the future development of Lakeview. This is a time of change that will affect us all well into the future.

Today

This section will very briefly list a few resources for the intrepid genealogist who might be interested in their roots and in the roots of this community. There are web links and other fun stuff.

Peel County Rootsweb Page
Ontario Genweb
Peel County Genweb
Ontario Genealogy
Historical Plaques of Ontario
Olive Tree Genealogy
Ontario Genealogy Society
Canadian Genealogy and History Links

WW2 era Lakeview Newspaper Articles

Here are some links to .pdf files for historic newspaper articles relating to Lakeview and the small arms and munitions plants during and around WW2. Thanks to Lynn Judge for her enthusiastic efforts to uncover these lost gems, which are truly a window into another time.

Help Wanted Female: Girl Operators 18-35 - Thursday January 29, 1942
Canada Sets Days Record of $63,475,200 For Loan - Thursday February 26, 1942
Small Arms Dance Tonight - Saturday March 28, 1942
Saboteur Army of Allies to Use Toronto-Made Gun - Monday June 29, 1942
Chinese Not Accepted - Wednesday September 23 1942
Small Arms Ltd. And Union Sign Agreement - Monday February 8, 1943
Personnel Officials Seek to Aid Women In Industry - Friday February 19, 1943
Fire Brigade Rates Offered Arms Plant - Thursday March 11, 1943
Small Arms Folk, Honored By Ilsley - Friday June 4, 1943
Study Food at War Plant AS 40 Women Workers Ill - Friday July 16, 1943
Grammas Tops As War Workers - Wednesday September 1, 1943
Womens War Work - (Fashion Photos) - Tuesday December 7, 1943
Female Robin Hoods Of Small Arms - Monday July 11, 1944(?)
Polish Refugee - Frank Sobosinski - Friday November 3, 1944
Must Face Plant Closings, Mayor Tells Control Board - Wednesday August 22, 1945
Grenade Explodes, Boy Killed 2 Hurt - Saturday Nov 24, 1945
Officials Implore Citizens To Leave Explosives Alone - Saturday November 24, 1945
Canadas 4th Service To Stand Ready For War - Monday February 11, 1946

Random Media Content

4 Sisters Come Crashing Down

This clip shows the 4 big stacks of the Lakeview Generating Station crashing to the ground. You can hear outspoken Lakeview Residents Association President Jim Tovey discussing mackerel in almost religious terms.

You might need to download XviD codec for windows to get this file to work as it is in a non-standard format(click on XviD for Windows by Koepi unless you are on a MAC then click the other option): http://www.xvidmovies.com/codec/ ,install it and then re-click on the 4 Sisters link.

 


 

 

 

 

 

March 2, 2008  - The approval of a 22-storey condominium tower to be built close to the Mississauga waterfront in Port Credit has residents' groups divided and has sparked fears it could lead to a highrise jungle along Lakeshore Rd.

 

 

 

 


"This could very well set a precedent for highrise buildings on the north side of Lakeshore going both east and west (of Hurontario St.)," says Ian Smith, president of the Town of Port Credit Association, a 100-household group formed to oppose the condo project called North Shore.


"There are certainly a number of sites along Lakeshore, in terms of the price of land and location, that are ideal for redevelopment and where taller buildings could be accommodated."  
 
 

 

Latest news (Mar 08) for the corner of Hurontario and Lake shore.

Evolving Port in a storm 

Lakeview Ratepayers Association

Evolving Port in a storm 

Latest news (Mar 08) for the corner of Hurontario and Lake shore.

 

What is being proposed for the Generating plant site?

 
 


  © DAVID PYLYP of Re/Max Realty Specialists Inc., Brokerage
Independently Owned and Operated
 
The trademarks MLS®, Multiple Listing Service® and the associated logos are owned by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify the quality of service provided by the real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license
The trademarks REALTOR®, REALTORS® and the REALTOR® logo are controlled by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license